Dinner Lunch Salad

Tom Hunt’s Roast Cauliflower with Caramelized Onions and Dukkah

January 24, 2017

Like a broken record, this salad has been on repeat the past weeks. You think that’s boring? Hm, I think it just needs to be good enough and I can’t get enough of it! While I enjoy it just as it is – a warm (and warming as there is coriander seeds, cumin and turmeric involved) savoury salad that can be eaten by itself or as a side dish, I also like what it has evolved into after having made it the tenth+ time… Wrapped up in a warm whole-grain pitta bread with a dollop of Greek (sheep’s) yoghurt and parsley, it really fulfills my very regular craving to bite into a tasty, filled bread, yoghurt and olive oil dripping out as I work my way through it. M.M.M.M.H.

The recipe for the salad is by Tom Hunt – you know, The Natural Cook, that has appeared…euhm…a couple of times before on this blog. You might wonder if he pays me for it, but no – I just fully and completely share his taste and I want to share this with you in return. I hope this sounds sensible.

The recipe for the salad is by Tom Hunt – you know, The Natural Cook, that has appeared…euhm…a couple of times before on this blog. You might wonder if he pays me for it, but no – I just fully and completely share his taste and I want to share this with you in return. I hope this sounds sensible.

 

Tom Hunt’s Roast Cauliflower with Caramelized Onions and Dukkah
Adapted from Tom Hunt’s The Natural Cook: Eating the seasons from root to fruit.

Serves 6

For the roasted cauliflower:
1 medium size cauliflower, leaves discarded (but saved for later)
light olive oil
½ teaspoon ground turmeric (curcuma)
1 teaspoon ground coriander seeds

Preheat the oven to 180°C.

Wash the cauliflower and cut into small slices. Drizzle with olive oil, turmeric and coriander and roast for about 30 minutes, or until golden-brown. Set aside.

For the dukkah:
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
20g hazelnuts

While the cauliflower is happily roasting in the oven, prepare the dukkah by dry toasting all ingredients separately in a small frying pan. Then ‘crush’ them altogether with a pestle and mortar until you have a fine powder.

Note: The dukkah is equally delicious on other (green) salads, vegetables or to spice up a simple pasta.

For the salad:
1 large onion or shallot, finely minced
2 tablespoons light olive oil
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
pinch of flaky sea salt
50g sultanas or raisins
leaves from the cauliflower (left whole), or alternatively a few kale leaves

Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a frying pan. Add the onion, cumin seeds and a pinch of sea salt and fry for about 10-15 minutes, or until the onions are completely soft and have taken on colour. Careful here as I find cumin seeds to burn easily. Add the sultanas, the cauliflower or kale leaves and the cauliflower. Mix well and check for salt. Keep on frying for 2-3 minutes. Take off heat.

To make the pitta bread sandwiches:
6 whole-grain pita breads
150g Greek yoghurt (I used sheep’s yoghurt which is available in whole foods stores)
a handful of parsley

Lightly toast the pitta breads. Cut open and fill with the cauliflower salad, add a spoonful of Greek yoghurt and sprinkle some dukkah and parsley on top.

 

 

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